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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up on the program -- thousands rally in tunisia in support of the government and against the the prime minister's plan to dissolve it. the search goes on but there's no trace of the meteorite that left a trail of destruction across central russia and the winner is, we'll be live from the berlin film festival with news of who's got the golden bear. thank you for joining us. a bomb targeting people shopping for vegetables has once again highlighted pakistan's deep sectarian tension. at least 60 have been killed in an explosion in the southwestern city of quetta. more than 200 were injured when a bomb exploded outside a market. police say it was aimed at the region's minority shia population. attacks in quetta have killed more than 200 in the past month. we have the latest from islamabad. what more do we know about this attack? >> hi, barbara. what we know is that this bomb, which went off in this market was very powerful bomb. it was an improvised explosive device
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
hearing begins in two and a half hours from now. >>> in tunisia today riot police filled the air with tear gas trying to keep furious crowds under control. have a look. these are the biggest and loudest protests in tunisia since the revolution there two years ago. the one that sparked the whole arab spring. a vocal critic of the government was shot dead outside his home yesterday. that infuriated people who say he was assassinated. it was political. they were already unhappy with tunisia's political situation since the arab spring the new islamist led government is keeping down individual freedoms. the people are not happy. tunisia's prime minister fired his cabinet and called for new elections hoping to calm tensions, then his deputy said the party wasn't unified on that. and it might not happen. we are watching developments. >>> let's gets back to our top story. a shooter on the loose in los angeles. the suspect a former cop is identified as christopher dorner. he was fired from the police force five years ago. and he might now be seeking revenge. dorner accused of shooting three los ang
in federal prison. in tunisia, new protests broke out in the capital, demanding the end of the government. it was the second day of unrest sparked by the killing of a leading opposition figure. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: in tunis today, crowds converged on the interior ministry on the same spot where the so-called arab spring began two years ago. "the people want the downfall of the regime" the chant once again. but this time the tear gas came from police loyal not to a dictator but to tunisia's democratically elected government, one which now stands accuse of complicity in political assassination. the victim was chokri belaid, shot outside his home yesterday by a gunman on a motorbike. belaid had appeared on television the night before he died. the s.e.c. tar politician told his interview that tunisia's governing islamist party harbored religious factions which incited violence. his killing prompted the biggest explosion of anger since the revolution itself. groups claiming that revolution had been stolen by islamists who w
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
-maliki. in tunisia, huge crowds of mourners protested as opposition leader chokri belaid was laid to rest. he was assassinated earlier this week. tens of thousands converged on the cemetery, with belaid's coffin draped in a tunisian flag. violence erupted as police fired tear gas and demonstrators threw stones and set cars ablaze. thousands of demonstrators turned out in cairo and other cities across egypt, protesting president mohammed morsi and his islamist-led government. the crowds defied hard-line muslim clerics, who called on their supporters to kill opposition leaders. as night fell, security forces used tear gas to disperse protesters who threw rocks and fire bombs at the presidential palace. gunmen in nigeria have killed at least nine women working to immunize children against the polio virus. the attacks today were in kano, in the african nation's muslim north. the killers were believed to come from boko haram, a radical islamic sect. polio remains endemic in nigeria, but some muslim clerics have charged the vaccinations are a plot to sterilize young girls. the british government to
exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an impact in countries we do not know enough about. we're doing a project with six editors in latin america to l
will get the approval of the assembly and the two nations. >> a major source of the tension in tunisia is the economic opportunity. two years after the government switched, they're still struggling to get good jobs. >> he started the revolution and by burning himself to death because of poverty and shame. today in the capital, another saying that things are better. >> its improving. it's better than before. >> not all is well. this is an enormous poor neighborhood home to half of the population of tunis. one in five people are unemployed and the percentages way higher here. >> they're playing a bigger role in the social protest. i think businesses, because they are seeing this dispute, unemployment is increasing quite dramatically. >> he is a science graduate who has not worked in his field in several years and he assured the government is to blame. >> the people in power must make major changes to bring the country from unemployment numbers social injustice, and equality to a situation they hope to achieve when they are read of the dictator. >> he is doing what he can survive putting
. >> tunisia's prime minister has resigned a day after his bid to set up a government of technocrats failed. it was opposed by other members of his governing party. then he announced his resignation after a meeting with the president. he had proposed the non-partisan government as a way out of the political crisis sparked by the opposition of a leading opposition figure. >> the german government has approved sending up to 330 german soldiers to mali to help the army in its battle against muslim militants one day after a european union trading mission was formally approved by eu foreign ministers in brussels -- european union training mission was formally approved. >> citizens are worried involvement could be a long, drawn-out affair like in afghanistan. the point has to be approved by the bundestag later this week. >> french and malian forces engaged in a gunbattle. under a new proposal, german troops would not join them on the front line, but they would provide more logistical support, like using airbus jets to refuel french warplanes mid-air. an additional 150 troops will be needed for th
, and he was briefly held by tunisia. take a listen to this. >> tunisians did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him. >> they did. >> where is he? we don't know. >> he's still in tunisia. >> that doesn't sound like a good system of working with our foreign partners. >> it shows the tunisians are working with their rule of law like we do. >> i know mr. rubio wants to sound ready for responsibility and if he's got some very strong testicles, but dismissing the rules and practices of a foreign nation, that's hardly the most mature way to approach international terrorism, is it? >> oh, martin, that's poppycock. come on. we should have been able to force the tunisian government to do exactly what we wanted them to do. >> we're not even in any kind of conflict with the tunisian -- >> i'm kidding, of course. while marco rubio was trying and similarly we saw this in the hearing with hillary clinton, he was trying very hard to show that he is in command of the facts and he is ready to be, you know, presidential and handle this kind of information, and, instead, what he ac
and operate. you have problems in mali, egypt libya, tunisia, all across north africa and -- >> rose: you do indeed. so therefore the idea of taking out in yemen an american citizen who had threatened america was justine th dick chey? >> yes. >> rose: by a drone attack. >> yes. he was clearly part of -- >> rose: should there will be checks and balances in terms of that? should there be some way -- >> take him to court? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i think when we hire the president of the united states he gets to live in the big house makes all that money, he's getting paid to make difficult, difficult decisions. >> rose: and this president has been prepared to step up and make those decisions? >> some of them he has. in other ways he is limiting the capacity of future presidtsto do it. every time you take down our military capabilities, every time you start laying up carriers instead of refueling them, every time you cut the defense budget with a meat ax, which is what he's doing, every time you do that, you're going to limit the capacity of the president ten, 15 years down the road to take acti
travelled almost a million miles. including a visit to egypt and tunisia in 2011. the birthplace of the arab spring. she walked through tahrir square, the rallying point for egypt's pro-democracy movement. >> hi. hello. >> welcome, hellry. >> hi. nice to see you. >> thank you. thank you. hello. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen.
happened in tunisia and egypt and took to the streets and demanded dignity and human rights. >> thank you for being with us, maryam al-khawaja, acting president of the bahrain center for human rights. her father, abdulhadi al- khawaja, also head of the organization, has been jailed since the government's crackdown, and she is replacing nabeel rajat, who was also head of that organization, who is also in prison right now she is in the united states on the second anniversary of the bahrain uprising, after returning to bahrain for two weeks, for the first time since she is living in self-imposed exile in copenhagen for two years. when we come back, we go to congo to speak with eve ensler, founder of v day and "1 billion rising." ♪ [music break] >> on this valentine's day, this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. >> people around the world are rising up today taking to the streets to dance, their actions are part of a global movement to end rape and sexual violence called 1 billion rising. it was launched by playwright eve ens
of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. >>> in tunisia right now, shock and angry protests after an outspoken opposition leader is gunned down. kate's here, she's got that and more of the top stories, kate? >> another story that's really troubling. a popular public figure and critic of tunisia's islamic-led government was according to an eyewitness, shot and killed as he left for work this morning. outraged protesters filled the streets and there were violent clashes with police. tunisia's prime minister condemned the assassination, saying the real target is, in his words, quote, the tunisian revolution as a whole. >>> also in germany, germany's education minister has been stripped of her ph.d in an embarrassing case of plagiarism, if you can even believe it, and she's the second minister in chancellor angela merkel's cabinet to face these allegations. the university awarded the minister the highest honors for her doctoral thesis, which one says has many plagiarized passages. >>> and just days after king richard iii's remains were identified undern
democracies across the world from libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating
urged leaders in egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world who are creating jobs and driving growth. so. so technology, development, human rights, women. now i know that a lot of pundits hear that and they say, could isn't that all a bit soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year's, that our diplomatic power, the ability to convene, our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world sees. 's seas. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda convicts affiliates and its wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. there are limits to what soft pow
in places like liberia. we have urged leaders of egypt tunisia and libya to recognize women as equal citizens with important contributions to make. we are supporting women entrepreneurs around the world and it would creating jobs in driving growth. said technology, development, human rights and women. i know that a lot of pundits are that list and they say isn't that all soft? what about the hard stuff? will, that is a false choice. we need both. and no one should think otherwise. i will be the first to stand up and proclaim loudly and clearly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make very clear as i have done over the last year that our diplomatic power needs the ability to convene our moral suasion is effective because united states can back up our words with action. we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world to see. we will relentlessly go after al qaeda and its affiliates and wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuke their weapon. there are limits to what
everyone. breaking news from tunisia this morning, more than 1 protesters have filled the streets in front of the interior ministry in the wake of the opposition leader. shot outside his home wednesday morning. he had recently formed a coalition of the communist governor of tune easetunisia. he had a backing of support and people are filling the streets shouting shame and the government should fail. two years ago, tunisia was the first country to overthrow its leader marking the start of the arab spring. the president is facing tough questions on drones after a leaked secret memo described using them to kill u.s. citizens. the paperif there is no specific informing about that attack. in reality, most of this information is already public as of last year. but many find it disturbing especially considering there is not much legal justification for using drones against american citizens. this now complicates the hearing of john brennan for confirmation as director of the cia. we are right back. (vo) this afternoon, current tv is the place for compelling
the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgling democracies flourish. and i want to thank william for his personal and important leadership at the u.k. is showing in marshaling the international community support for libya. i think he and the people at the united kingdom can be proud of their leadership in that the. we obviously discussed syria today. william and i agree the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that nowadays and threatens their everyday lives, the lives of innocent people, the lives of people who want the ability to have the government accountable and be able to be part of the governance of their own lives. the assad regime has rained out brackets, but though in recent days. that is just the latest example of assad's brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms and it is just further evidence that assad has to go. i think william for the u.k. effort to help dial-up
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
but it is an important one. in tunisia as you follow mentioned the support of the regime and need to go away but they need to be reconstituted in such a way that they serve a democratic state. we need to engage that question if we determine that that is in our interests. we have a failed state. it isn't the subject of a grand policy debate in the country because it seems too far away. but don't pay attention to the problem long enough and see what happens. it will be much less costly for us now to invest in a modest way to reconstitute the bases -- yellowing paper ongoing system to get intimate questions with poverty iain dhaka, and then of course the call continuing in this are a we have to then think about nigeria, northern nigeria. of the are to drive and for today's juan him to drive is another. there's only four days of traveling and its very, very important for us analysts to stop thinking from the national perspective s and start thinking from the regional perspectives. that is the only way that we are going to comprehend the dynamics appear of the challenges that are in front of us a
diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
in detail to what i perceive as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i may, on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members to the right questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as we i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. >> john brennan has the counterterrorism advisory for your years and now nominate background the president to be the c.i.a. director. we're wrapping up four hours of testimony. we're opening up the phone lines to find out about the issues discussed and
throughout in the world and not all, obviously are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is that in most countries, in the world, we can rely on the host country to provide security. they're there. they're willing to do it. they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern. and those were the nineteen that we're designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and develop a better approach to providing security. because there part of the problem is the host countries are not very good at providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems this is so much of a distance in time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond? how far away are we? is there a almost like a playbook for the ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow. jump on them immediately if it dpunlt click we go this or that? >> the best playbook the general responded this as well. the best playbook is an ambassador who says, we have got serious security problems h
, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the benghazi facility. it was focused on the primar
of change in north africa and the middle east, some of those countries, such as egypt, libya and tunisia, are more susceptible to extremism and radicalisation. were these countries discussed and was any action proposed? >> i thank my honorable friend for his support. as i said earlier, there was a discussion specifically about mali, but there is more to be done to support democracy and the building blocks of democracy in countries such as egypt and libya. the eu, with its partnership and neighbourhood funds, has a role to play there. >> has my right honorable friend received an apology from the shadow chancellor, who, as we were reminded, said in the chamber last october that the government had failed to build the alliances needed to deliver a real-terms eu budget cut? >> i am not sure the shadow chancellor really does apologies, but it has been great to be cheered to the echo by him during today's statement. i will not expect it every time, but it has been a pleasure. >> as a business owner, when negotiating with suppliers i was always able to drive down costs when there was a clear alt
concerning nuclear weapons. libya is obvious, mali, egypt in a state of unrest, now tunisia. we're probably the more unsettled. since the end of the cold war they certainly have ever seen. would you agree with that assessment? >> i absolutely agree. >> meanwhile, signal we send to the radiant is don't worry this aircraft carrier is not coming. this is really a disconnect, the likes of which i have never seen before. now i want to talk about the sequestration because senator graham, senator ayotte and i traveled around warning about the effects of sequestration. we went to a lot of places where men and women in the military say how can we possibly do this, cause this uncertainty in the lives of the men and women who are serving? latest being cancellation of deployment of the aircraft carrier? meanwhile, the president of the united states that it won't happen. during the campaign, won't happen. we're worried for a long time that it was going to happen in this disgraceful to treat the men and women in the military, who we all speak with such advocacy and passion on their behalf to be subject i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)